[New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris


10 thoughts on “[New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris

  1. says: [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris

    read & download Romantic Moderns summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download I had had my eye on Alexandra Harris' Romantic Moderns for uite a while before picking it up both as a generally interesting piece of writing and an aid to my PhD thesis Physically it is a gorgeous tome with heavy cream paper and lavish colour illustrations throughout In her book Harris discusses the 'modern English renaissance' whi

  2. says: Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris

    Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris A very enjoyable journey into the Modernist movement in Britain during the 1930s and 1940s with well developed themes and exploration of the artists and writers who defined it Very well written and presented with nice uality illustrations

  3. says: [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris

    [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris The 1930s and early 1940s were a critical period in the formation of British culture The Second World War was to mark a decisive turning point one that created a self image for many Britons that though now under pressure f

  4. says: [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download

    [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download I can't join in the applause this book has been receiving I think the argument of the book isn't very well made and I sup

  5. says: read & download Romantic Moderns summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download

    [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris read & download Romantic Moderns An engaging book about the attempts in British art and culture during the 1930s and 1940s to reconcile the formal experimentation of modernism with the traditions of British life Harris takes the reader on a journe

  6. says: [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris

    read & download Romantic Moderns summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download In Romantic Moderns Alexandra Harris takes a new approach to Modernism in art and literature as it manifested itself in England The movement here was not the one of clean lines white space and daring experiments in novels drama and poetry that we tend to think of in its continental guise Those trends were all present in England but fertilised by attachments to the past native landscapes architecture and flor

  7. says: [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris

    read & download Romantic Moderns summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download I have to admit that I'm rather jealous of Alexandra Harris Not many PhD theses are this readable mine certainly isn't Broadly covering British culture between the wars a great over simplification her study is fantastically wide ranging Not only does she bridge the literary and visual arts with apparent ease but she manages to take in music cookery and gardening as well Despite this range it's remarkably focused That's in part o

  8. says: [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris

    [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris Fascinating account of the reaction of English artists and authors to modernism and how it influenced them even when they ap

  9. says: [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris

    [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris I’ve been meaning to read this book for years It’s a period of history and cast of characters I’m uite interesting inAlexandra Harris writes about the particular strain of English modernism not gleaming as you might see it on the continent but harking back to earlier times It covers a wide gamut of topics all of it put acros

  10. says: [New] (Romantic Moderns) Author Alexandra Harris Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris

    read & download Romantic Moderns summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download There is much in this book that I admired but it also felt like a romp through 30s and 40s Britain At times it seemed to be a modernist stream of consciousness

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summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris

Romantic Moderns

Romantic Moderns summary á 109 Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download read & download Romantic Moderns Tive project was shared by writers painters gardeners architects critics and composers Piper abandoned purist abstracts to make collages on the blustery coast; Virginia Woolf wrote in her last novel about a village pageant on a showery summer day Evelyn Waugh Elizabeth Bowenand the Sitwells are also part of the story along with Bill Brandt and Graham Sutherland Eric Ravilious and Cecil Beat. I ve been meaning to read this book for years It s a period of history and cast of characters I m uite interesting inAlexandra Harris writes about the particular strain of English modernism not gleaming as you might see it on the continent but harking back to earlier times It covers a wide gamut of topics all of it put across in a very easy to read style

read & download Romantic Moderns

Romantic Moderns summary á 109 Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download read & download Romantic Moderns In the 1930s and 1940s while the battles for modern art and modern society were being fought in Paris and Spain it seemed to some a betrayal that John Betjeman and John Piper were in love with a provincial world of old churches and tea shopsAlexandra Harris tells a different story eclectically passionatelywittily urgently English artists were exploring what it meant to be alive at that mome. The 1930s and early 1940s were a critical period in the formation of British culture The Second World War was to mark a decisive turning point one that created a self image for many Britons that though now under pressure from the dominance of a multi cultural globalist London imbued them with a sense of their own difference from Europe based on a nostalgia for aristocracy country and rural communityAlexandra Harris solid contribution to cultural history provides a welcome summary of that process the conservative side the creation of a modernising neo romanticism epitomised by artists and illustrators such as John Piper Edward Bawden Eric Ravilious Ivon Hitchens and Rex Whistler but also by many writers and intellectuals photographers eccentrics garden designers architects and othersShe argues persuasively that the middle class English mind she does not argue in class terms and that she does not place her narrative within a wider historical context is a weakness adopted the intrusive modernist European culture in the early interwar period only to adapt it in the 1930s to a conservative traditionalist and earth bound and ruralist subject matterShe writes well although she falls into the classic trap of being so determined to do justice to specific works and writers that interesting little gobbets of data about key figures overwhelm any sense of a grand narrative Sometimes one wonders whether she has actually demonstrated her thesis rather than suggested that she might be able to demonstrate it when she has stopped entertaining usEach chapter is like an essay but the accumulation of essays does not uite present the persuasive argument that it should especially as there is an almost wilful neglect of the eually or dominant trends that drove the progressive middle class and the popular culture of the working class Not that she should have discussed these other trends in any depth which was not her mission but only that it might have been useful if we had been given a better idea in passing of what was competing for the attention of the publicBy way of a small example we may take the short reference to a film of significance Powell and Pressburger s A Canterbury Tale This is a wartime propaganda piece of 1944 which can easily be found on YouTube and is a minor masterpiece of the neo romantic sensibility Her account of it is excellent and insightful but short and because the nuances are not covered from lack of space and of interest in the sociology of culture unintentionally potentially misleading The film is propaganda precisely because by 1944 the conservative middle classes in the country had been relatively neglected in terms of mass mobilisation Although the urban characters are definitely ruralised into some conservative values partly to appeal to the evidently targeted mid Western American audience that also needed to be persuaded of the value of coming sacrifices the bottom line is still a message like Colonel Blimp s the world has changed and you have to change tooThe country suire who pours glue into girls hair is let off the hook because he is a decent conservative cove but he is left alone at the end ignored even as a petty criminal of sorts So much Harris gets but the message that there is in fact no room for pure traditionalism is I believe much strongly expressed than is implied This is not about traditionalists using modern methods in support of traditional values but something uite different a respect for the junior role of traditional values and skills within an essentially modernist ideology of victory planning and reconstruction This is closer by an edge to Soviet support for Uzbek folk dancing than it is to the values of most of the writers and artists outlined in the book Artists also have to eat so we have Shell s important patronage of the neo romantics to consider and the neo romantic aspects of the Festival of Britain in much the same terms the appropriation of traditionalist memes and images for essentially modernist purposes reversing at this point the originating thesis of Harris book which is the appropriation of modernist ideas and techniues to reinvigorate traditional arts where she is absolutely right in her analysisInterestingly the film did not do particularly well critically at the time It is instructive that lauded though they are today neo romantic ideas did not really reach into popular or even elite culture until after the war and sponsorship by very modern institutions such as advertising agencies and government information operations far from the church and the village artistic community This was however an important element in the revolt against war socialism that led to the return of a conservative government Britain had incorporated traditionalist memes and forms but it had no intention of doing anything than that The aggressive nostalgia of Brideshead Revisited and the clever appropriation of rural romanticism by Shell both kick started a rediscovery of past and country but the visitors are clearly detached both country and aristocracy are safely tamed for viewing The modern National Trust visitor dutifully plods through the state rooms of its properties but he or she cannot wait to settle down in the old kitchens with a decent cup of tea and a home made cakeThe modern leisured middle class whether middle aged retired or in family mode communes not with the grand history of dates and family trees but with the invented memory of their own past Their ancestors were far likely to have been in service than been a Despenser or a Beckford The sub text is that Middle England now owns its own past through its memberships even if there are rules as to when you can take tea and when visitThe monster of aristocratic privilege is tamed much as Nosferatu becomes a children s cartoon with the passing of sufficient generations The substance of Britain was already modern in the 1930s let alone the 1950s The greater the modernisation the bigger the possibility of a safe space to be allocated for the former monstrous oppressive powers of lords and prelates Harris book is thus particularly important because she outlines all the many tools that were available for the next generation of appropriators seeking a settled Britain tools that could be derived from the antiuarian and rural sensibility of the 1930s The neo romantic advertisements for Shell were naturally succeeded by the steady saving of country houses for the middle classes to do their Downton Abbey act later while green belts emerged to let ribbon developments breathe We must grateful for this yet see it for it what it is after all it was often the Left that seemed as keen as anyone to preserve what was left of the past precisely because it contained no threat It could be captured much like Labour had captured the State itself in 1945 Nevertheless as the decades passed a wider conservative traditionalist mentality emerged and became locked into the suburban and small town mentality of the English middle classes It might include country Anglicanism visiting churches rather than services the National Trust actually a very efficient and modern organisation repeated watching of variants of Brideshead Revisited rediscovered for manufactured nostalgia every two or three decades either directly or through bastardised copies such as Downton and wholly dependent on the very modern medoum of television English gardening and English cooking To many Britons this neo romantic idyll is pretty well what England now is outside Londonwith appropriate regional variants The book itself starts with a church font and ends with a country house Everything between these two symbolic artefacts of man seems to be a a gloss on modern responses to a once dominant Anglican faith and to a lost aristocracy Perhaps Harris likes it all a bit too much but that is her privilege It is all very beautiful in its way even if much of it is fakeAnother bookend is intellectual between the cold platonic formalism of Fry and the Bloomsbury set on the one hand and the somewhat deadly idealistic communitarian cultural theory of Leavis Both thinkers represent all that was dreary in those intellectuals who pontificated from high on what was appropriate and what was not The irony of contemporary criticism of the Victorians is that many of their critics never broke free of the same fundamentalist judgmentalism Harris reading however of Virginia Woolf is particularly interesting because she gives good cause to see her as symbolic of the flow from urban formalism to a nuanced position There is further work to be done perhaps on Woolf as psycho geographer Somehow I found it hard to grasp what precisely Harris wanted to say about her but that may be my fault and not hersThe radical conservative aspects are also covered in pieces on T S Eliot and Rolf Gardiner and though modernists who remained modernists tended to the left albeit a somewhat authoritarian Left you can see without making it a rule the shift into church and community over time of many other significant figures But why no mention of Eric Gill Is it sheer embarrassment at what we know of his sexual proclivities Yet it is hard not see him as central to the merging of modernist simplicity and Christianity well in advance others The silence is all the stranger when we consider the importance placed by Harris on the Midland Hotel in Morecombe and the fact that Spencer gets a mentionThere is also surprisingly limited coverage of the Inklings They were meeting in and around Oxford precisely duruing the period in uestion and though never modernists they represented an essential bridge to Christian fantasy Perhaps Tolkien might have been off topic but Charles Williams should not be his account of a village play at the heart of Descent into Hell should have been grist to Harris millPerhaps we should not complain that there is no real wider context for the movement such as it was no sense of how these shifts related to the rise of left wing responses to European fascism nor of how it might have been an attempt to construct a uniuely liberal English third way a political strategy of cultural withdrawal in the context of depression war and increasingly death duties The neo romantic impulse with added modernity is the nostalgic love affair of the English middle class with a no longer threatening aristocracy Harris points out Waugh s evident and successful strategy of creating allies in the middle classes against socialism and it is true that at this point in history as across Europe the middle classes were coming to prefer the now weakened conservative devil they knew to the devil of world changing working class and urban organisation While one part of British middle class culture was becoming deeply engaged in issues and becoming earnest Orwell being a good example this other element was slipping into a sort of anti decadent art for nearly art s sake in which religious and rural themes gave meaning as subjectsThis is the turn when old Liberal England whose political death was uite sudden which had thought itself the permanent sole rival to conservative England with the organised working classes well in hand started to realise that the game had changed Progressive Fabians might have stuck with their alliance with the rising trades unions but most middle class people soon felt threatened by state corporatism The liberal minded doctor might have come to be suspicious of the plans for a National Health ServiceA shift from modernism to neo romanticism in aesthetic terms is precisely that political shift from traditional conservatism towards modern conservatism that was articulated by Stanley Baldwin PM thre times until 1937 and which now provides the basis for the last gasp of old Etonian leadership in Johnson Osborne and Cameron todayThose on the Left are often puzzled that three Old Etonians straight out of Waugh are running one of the two great parties of state much as Tories are puzzled that two brothers can be rivals in an apparently anti aristocratic party of the Left The fact that it scarcely matters to half of the English is partly explained by this book Our Old Etonians are simply reversals of the Disraeli deal that is where once the aristocrats hired a middle class guy and gave him a mini version of their own large country houses the conservative middle classes hire Old Etonians as ersatz aristocrats to deliver their otherwise broadly liberal prejudices along conservative linesA final word of praise for Thames Hudson The illustrations are not only apposite and beautifully printed but in nearly every case actually relate directly to their references in the text minimising that bug bear of non fiction reading having to abandon the page to go and rummage through a block of illustrations elsewhereAll in all an entertaining and well written book which is recommended for anyone interested in English cultural history

summary â E-book, or Kindle E-pub ✓ Alexandra Harris

Romantic Moderns summary á 109 Alexandra Harris ✓ 9 read & download read & download Romantic Moderns Nt and in England They showed that “the modern”need not be at war with the past constructivists and conservatives could work together and even the Bauhaus émigré László Moholy Nagy was beguiled into taking photos for Betjeman’s nostalgic An Oxford University ChestA rich network of personal and cultural encounters was the backdrop for a modern English renaissance This great imagina. An engaging book about the attempts in British art and culture during the 1930s and 1940s to reconcile the formal experimentation of modernism with the traditions of British life Harris takes the reader on a journey through art John Piper features prominently as do critics like Roger Fry and Cyril Connolly and the Shell Mex adverts of the mid century literature Elizabeth Bowen Virginia Woolf T S Eliot Evelyn Waugh John Betjeman W H Auden food writing horticulture architecture and In each case she investigates the ways that thinkers tried to tap into strains of a specifically British traditions the village green the rolling hills the hedgerows the parish church the cloudy weather the country piles the gardens and bring them together with the abstract geometric progressive world of modernismThere s a tremendous amount of food for thought here The book is very much aimed at the general reader who will come away from this book with a renewed appreciation for the intellectual journey of a John Betjeman or an Osbert Sitwell But lurking in the background here throughout never uite mentioned openly is of course class Certainly many of these thinkers and their attempts to carve out a British modernism seem to revolve entirely around large country mansions landscaped gardens and other facets of a specific type of English life unavailable to the majority Indeed cities and the working class people who live in them barely feature at all in Romantic Moderns which I think is a shame

  • Hardcover
  • 320
  • Romantic Moderns
  • Alexandra Harris
  • English
  • 04 March 2019
  • 9780500251713